This isn’t the weapon you’re looking for

Can you hold on until we get there?

Maybe I’m the only one, but when I look at this graphic I’m most impressed by women’s ability to hold a child in over Christmas:

Wiggle wiggle!

Depressingly accurate:

Bring on Humperdink

The eurovision song contest is a window into the different cultures of Europe, I’m just not sure which room I’m looking in on.

E vs n

3-1 for everton. Good stuff. They’ve still got a perfect record for matches I’ve attended. And now to start drinking for serious.

E v n

2 goals for the everton. Good start.

Everton vs newcastle part iii

image

Wine on tap! This place is hard core.

Everton vs Newcastle part ii

Two points in, at the second pub. Thinking of food. Still trending in a worrying direction.

Everton vs newcastle.

In Liverpool for the football today. 9:30 first pint. Could be messy.

Two soda farls please. Danke.

For reasons that I won’t go into here (because I don’t know what they are) Northern Ireland banks are allowed to print their own money, which are exchangeable at par for UK pounds:

Apparently in 2004 back when banks buying other banks seemed like a good idea, a Danish bank by the name of Danske Bank purchased Northern Bank. Which leads to a slight odd proposition, that of a foreign bank having the right to print UK £ notes. But they were still called Northern Bank, and so I guess people reconciled themselves to that dissonance. However recently plans have been announced to rebrand Northern Bank to Danske Bank. And I heard on the radio that they are going to withdraw their Northern Bank notes, and are currently in negotiations with the Treasury to start printing Danske bank notes. Which I think we can all agree is weird, to be paying for things in the UK with a Danske bank note. I hope their made of lego (Danske is a Danish bank apparently).

An interesting addendum to this story. In 2004 the IRA (unconfirmed) robbed £26.5 million from the main Northern Bank branch in Belfast, which is still the largest bank robbery in UK and Irish history. However about half of that was in unused Northern Bank notes (plastic notes apparently, like they have in Australia), so the bank simply never used those issued those notes as currency, leaving the robbers with £10 million in the equivalent of fancy monopoly money. The bank robbery is still unsolved.